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Posts Tagged ‘Fuel Cell’

KARA GILMOUR, NewsOXY.com, July 26, 2009

honda-hybrid-carsHonda electric vehicles will expand further on the hybrid idea offering consumers more of a variety from popular post-conventional concept vehicles.

The new 2010 Honda Hybrid Cars will provide consumers with better options for electric and fuel cell technologies. What is more important is that these new automobiles will deliver better mileage than we see today. Some of the vehicles will be slated as 2011 models but will release in early and late 2010.

2010 Hybrid Cars

New fuel-efficient vehicles are continuing to grow in popular demand. Recent gas prices are steering more consumers towards automobiles that achieve a minimum of 35 miles per gallon. However, automakers are in a race to deliver 50+ miles per gallon vehicles for next year.

Honda has major plans to compete in the growing fuel-efficient market by taking some of its popular conventional vehicles and converting them into new fuel efficient alternatives. While the Honda Civic has already been on the market as an alternative fuel automobile, the automaker wants to use its current engineering built in the 2010 Insight. Some of the features include longer battery life and a leaner, but more powerful, gasoline engine.

Insight Interactive Dashboard Components

The dashboard in the Honda Insight has also been popular. Honda wants to migrate some of the dashboard components into the Honda Fit and the upcoming Civic. The interactive dashboard assists the driver to achieve better mileage by scoring driving habits that increase fuel economy. It is not known if the dash will be in the new FCX Clarity.

Honda FCX Clarity

Honda also wants to offer consumers a 75 mpg rating with its FCX Clarity. This is a car that runs on electric and hydrogen fuel. The automobile is 20% more fuel efficient and has a powertrain that is 45% more compact.

In addition, the car is about 10% energy efficiency. Skeptics believe the vehicle might be ahead of its time due to questions on how to refuel the vehicle. There are also safety concerns but Honda has already developed measures to deactivate the hydrogen tanks in the event of a collision.

Electric Alternative Vehicles

Even so, there are more consumers hoping for electric alternative transportation. Full hybrids already use a combination of gasoline and battery to power the electric motor. Consumers are hoping for a complete electric option that will allow drivers to recharge the battery using a standard home outlet.

These vehicles are built for short range driving because of the electric battery. The automobiles can be powered by a battery at slower speeds. These speeds are usually between 35 to 47 mph.

Unfortunately, the battery is limited on the amount of energy it can store, which is why most of these vehicles use a gas engine to help with the recharge. The auto industry right now isn’t quite ready for a total electric solution, but it is getting close. There are several advancements with batteries that could change the way we refuel our automobiles by 2012.

Auto Industry

You have to admit that while the auto industry has been kicked to the curb by the recession, they sure are coming out with new ideas. Perhaps it was the recession and the 2008 gas prices that got things moving again. There is a lot that will happen soon and those 2010 Honda hybrid cars are only the beginning.

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Kouji Kariatsumari, Nikkei Electronics, June 13, 2008

Genepax Co Ltd explained the technologies used in its new fuel cell system “Water Energy System (WES),” which uses water as a fuel and does not emit CO2.

The system can generate power just by supplying water and air to the fuel and air electrodes, respectively, the company said at the press conference, which took place June 12, 2008, at the Osaka Assembly Hall.

The basic power generation mechanism of the new system is similar to that of a normal fuel cell, which uses hydrogen as a fuel. According to Genepax, the main feature of the new system is that it uses the company’s membrane electrode assembly (MEA), which contains a material capable of breaking down water into hydrogen and oxygen through a chemical reaction.

Though the company did not reveal the details, it “succeeded in adopting a well-known process to produce hydrogen from water to the MEA,” said Hirasawa Kiyoshi, the company’s president. This process is allegedly similar to the mechanism that produces hydrogen by a reaction of metal hydride and water. But compared with the existing method, the new process is expected to produce hydrogen from water for longer time, the company said.

With the new process, the cell needs only water and air, eliminating the need for a hydrogen reformer and high-pressure hydrogen tank. Moreover, the MEA requires no special catalysts, and the required amount of rare metals such as platinum is almost the same as that of existing systems, Genepax said.

Unlike the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC), which uses methanol as a fuel, the new system does not emit CO2. In addition, it is expected to have a longer life because catalyst degradation (poisoning) caused by CO does not occur on the fuel electrode side. As it has only been slightly more than a year since the company completed the prototype, it plans to collect more data on the product life.

At the conference, Genepax unveiled a fuel cell stack with a rated output of 120W and a fuel cell system with a rated output of 300W. In the demonstration, the 120W fuel cell stack was first supplied with water by using a dry-cell battery operated pump. After power was generated, it was operated as a passive system with the pump turned off.

This time, the voltage of the fuel cell stack was 25-30V. Because the stack is composed of 40 cells connected in series, it is expected that the output per cell is 3W or higher, the voltage is about 0.5-0.7V, and the current is about 6-7A. The power density is likely to be not less than 30mW/cm2 because the reaction area of the cell is 10 x 10 cm.

Meanwhile, the 300W fuel cell system is an active system, which supplies water and air with a pump. In the demonstration, Genepax powered the TV and the lighting equipment with a lead-acid battery charged by using the system. In addition, the 300W system was mounted in the luggage room of a compact electric vehicle “Reva” manufactured by Takeoka Mini Car Products Co Ltd, and the vehicle was actually driven by the system.

Genepax initially planned to develop a 500W system, but failed to procure the materials for MEA in time and ended up in making a 300W system.

For the future, the company intends to provide 1kw-class generation systems for use in electric vehicles and houses. Instead of driving electric vehicles with this system alone, the company expects to use it as a generator to charge the secondary battery used in electric vehicles.

Although the production cost is currently about ¥2,000,000 (US$18,522), it can be reduced to ¥500,000 or lower if Genepax succeeds in mass production. The company believes that its fuel cell system can compete with residential solar cell systems if the cost can be reduced to this level.

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CHUCK SQUATRIGLIA, Autopia at Wired, June 12, 2008

Volkswagen’s hydrogen fuel cell Tiguan made its North American debut today, and it’s a pretty slick bit of kit even if it won’t appear in showrooms anytime soon, if at all.

Although the company was also showing off its upcoming diesel Jetta TDI and talking a lot about the TDI Cup diesel racing series it sponsors, the Tiguan HyMotion was clearly the star of the show. It’s an advancement over the HyMotion Touran it replaces, but company officials made it clear they aren’t betting on hydrogen alone to save us.

“There isn’t one technology, one fuel, that will provide the answer,” John Tillman, who leads VW’s advanced powertrain division in the U.S, told Wired.com. “We have multiple technologies. This is just one of them.”

The company is pushing clean diesel in a big way and expects it to comprise 30% of its sales within a decade. But, like a growing number of automakers, it believes “the electric motor is the ideal prime mover for sustainable economy,” and Tillman says VW is working on hybrid and battery electric drivetrains.

Volkswagen’s been playing with fuel cells for 10 years now, and it launched a dedicated fuel cell and EV research center in 2001. The Tiguan HyMotion is its fourth generation FCV and the its most advanced.

The proton exchange membrane fuel cell generates 80 kW, but it’s coupled with an electric motor and lithium-ion battery that bump output to 100 kW (about 134 horsepower). That’s enough to propel the Tiguan, which weighs about 4,122 pounds, from zero to 60 in 14 seconds and a top speed of 93 mph. Not great, but better than the Touran’s 86 mph. The battery has a charge capacity of 6.8 Ah and is charged by the fuel cell and regenerative braking. The HyMotion also uses stop-start technology to reduce fuel consumption.

Besides their astronomical price, one of the shortcomings of fuel cell vehicles is their range, and the Tiguan offers a relatively paltry 160 miles. It carries 3.5 kilograms of gaseous hydrogen in a tank made of carbon fiber, kevlar and aluminum at a pressure of 10,000 pounds – twice that of the Touran. “We could go higher, but who’s going to provide the fueling infrastructure at that pressure?” said Westley Khin, one of the engineers who worked on the car.

Ah yes, the fueling infrastructure. The Achilles heal of fuel cell vehicles, along with the astronomical cost of the cars themselves. Khin concedes both are the big stumbling blocks to the commercialization, but says “the vehicles are here” and they work well. That may be, but VW’s only built two HyMotion Tiguans and doesn’t have any plans to start putting them in driveways like Honda’s doing with the FCX Clarity.

“The FCX Clarity is a good vehicle. But we want to introduce a vehicle when the customer has the capacity to fuel it. We don’t see that happening anytime soon,” Tillman says, adding that VW is “working on developing” a home-hydrogen station along the lines of what Honda’s got.

By the way, we asked Tillman if there’s any chance we’ll see that sweet 71 mpg diesel-electric Golf hybrid VW unvieled earlier this year at the Geneva Motor Show. “We’re looking at it. I don’t have a timeline, but we are looking at it,” is all he’d say.

VW realizes there’s a market for the car but says the problem is making it affordable. Hybrid drivetrains are expensive – they add about $5K to the sticker price. So are diesel engines, which cost about two grand more than similarly-sized gasoline engines. Put them together in the same car and things quickly get expensive. “We have to get it to a price point that people can actually afford,” Tillman said.

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