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Archive for the ‘Killing Protesters’ Category

April 6, 2019 by Laurel Krause

On the May 4, 1970 Kent State massacre, written by my father Arthur S. Krause to Richard M. Nixon and published in the New York Times on May 7, 1978 🌺

A Memo to Mr. Nixon:

In the published extracts from your memoirs, you blame the news media for misinterpreting your categorization of student demonstrators as “bums.” Your remark was made just a few days before my daughter, Allison, was killed at Kent State University, on May 4, 1970, and you say you were “stunned” to learn of her death, and that of the other students shot by Ohio National Guardsmen.

You claim that the days after the killings “were among the darkest” of your Presidency, and that you were “utterly dejected” when you read that I had said, “My daughter was not a bum.”

By reducing what I actually said to this simplistic capsule sentence, you are once again avoiding the crucial question I had asked eight years ago: “Have we come to such a state in this country that a young girl has to be shot because she disagrees deeply with the actions of her Government?”

Your sympathy was such that you had to write personal letters to the parents of the four dead students, even though you “knew that words could not help.” If this is true, then why did you make such a mockery of your private grief for our sons and daughters by publicly implying that they were responsible for their own deaths and their killers blameless?

“When dissent turns to violence,” you told the American people, “it invites tragedy,” but in your letter to my wife and me you expressed the hope that we could “take comfort from the sympathy the entire nation feels.” Words from fellow citizens, who really understood what had happened at Kent State, did help us, but from our President we expected much more than personal condolences and public political condemnation.

Presidential action would have immeasurably tempered our grief and anger at the deliberate shooting down of our children, and on May 16, 1970, John D. Ehrlichman personally assured me that there would be no “whitewash” of what had happened.

In other words, the Nixon Administration was committed to seeing that justice was done if Ohio exonerated all official and guardsmen from criminal responsibility, which a state grand jury did in October 1970.

The cruel duplicity in these claims to personal grief and desires for justice have just been exposed for what they truly are by NBC-TV news.

At a time (November 1970) when you well knew that I was almost begging for a Federal grand jury investigation of the killings, you instructed Attorney general John Mitchell not to convene a grand jury. How, I ask, does this square with your claims of personal sympathy?

You saw the photographs of the four young men and women shot to death at distances of 270 to almost 400 feet, and in your memoirs you say you “couldn’t get the photographs out of your mind.”

Watergate and the cover-up was your nemesis, but NBC-TV has not shown that your first obstruction of justice occurred six months after Kent State, when you “instructed” the Attorney General of the United States not to convene a Federal grand jury regardless of what the evidence might have warranted.

To learn of your personal veto of a Federal grand jury months before Justice Department officials were assuring me that killings were still under “intensive investigation” is to prove, in my opinion, all the charges leveled against in the Watergate scandal.

There is poetic justice in the fact that your self-serving account of deep sorry for the death of my daughter, Allison, and of Sand Scheuer, Jeff Miller and Bill Schroeder, should be published on the eve of NBC’s report on how you truly felt.

Is there to be no end to your deceptions, omissions and outright distortions of historical fact?

Kent State Truth Tribunal The Allison Center for Peace Peaceful Party

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March 26, 2019 by Laurel Krause

As a survivor of the May 4, 1970 Kent State massacre, late March 2019 has been a painful time. Over the past week two survivors of the Parkland massacre have killed themselves and one father of a child killed at Sandy Hook took his life at Town Hall. These three suicides provide clues to the world yet few in America understand the reasons these survivors have taken their lives. https://cnn.it/2CPhEB1

My sister Allison Krause’s killing by gunfire from Ohio National Guardsmen as she protested the Vietnam war on her Kent State University campus, and her death in this very public massacre defines my life. My experiences with grief and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have transformed me into who I am today.

As I share my story of Kent State PTSD, I hope it encourages others to heal their own wounds of trauma whatever they may be. Life is for living and healing.

These three suicides deeply re-injured my Kent State wounds. The soul of America suffers even more. Because our government traumatizes us, all Americans have these wounds that never really heal. Unless we take steps to heal, wounds continue to fester and trigger us throughout our lives.

When I Lost Allison

At 15 years old arriving home from junior high school, I had no idea how important May 4, 1970 was going to be in my life. From the bags of mail received by my family for a decade, we learned many Americans also felt the trauma and were angry from the wrongs of that day. Many shared how they felt it “could have been them.” http://bit.ly/P4T2SN

Following Allison’s killing, there was no help, support and care from the U.S. government who perpetrated Kent State and Jackson State. My family along with other Kent State survivors and many peaceful protesters against war became enemies of the state. Because my family demanded truth at Kent State were “it” and we have been ever since. Project Censored on Kent State truth by Mickey Huff and Laurel Krause http://bit.ly/2vherUw

The war came home in May 1970. Our government targeted us delivering generational trauma at Kent State in the killing of four students and wounding of nine at an antiwar protest, and 11 days later two students killed, 12 wounded at Jackson State. The U.S. government aimed gun violence at student protesters against war. Following the massacres, the government investigated itself deflecting with confusing stories, demanding we all “move on” and let it go. http://bit.ly/1l2UIjm

For almost 50 years, we have watched American institutions, their lapdog media, law enforcement and the courts refuse accountability for massacres. With the 50th on May 4, 2020, they busily rewrite the ‘stories’ of Kent State transmiting their vision, censoring all other narratives as they invest in ‘their experts,’ documentaries, a museum, tour, exhibits and monument narratives. Read about the Allison tribute http://bit.ly/2zKXPYW

So what is their “official” story about Kent State? A confusing story about the Kent State shootings and how it was an “unfortunate incident.” No acknowledgement of wrongdoing, no expert investigation or credible research, no admittance of government involvement and certainly few amends made to all who were harmed. Yet despite their efforts to command us to “move on” without acknowledgement, truth continues to emerge.

In 2010, 40 years after Kent State, truth emerged in audio evidence from the May 4th massacre. A digital examination by international forensic expert Stuart Allen found game-changing new evidence yet Kent State University and the U.S. government refused his analyses and continue to ignore Allen’s findings. Why? It’s pretty simple. Allen’s findings found Kent State “commands-to-fire” opening the door to issues around “command responsibility” and government complicity. Those in power know that without proper investigation, there is no opportunity for amends to be made and there will be no healing. http://bit.ly/aM7Ocm and http://bit.ly/R4Ktio.

Seeking your tax-deductible DONATION to the Kent State Truth Tribunal through our fiscal sponsor the Institute for Media Analysis.

Back then young people knew we were all in this together, yet our government had other ideas and worked to splinter our solidarity. Their tactics included scapegoating students and protesters by demonizing us, calling us “bums” days earlier and sparing no expense to perpetuate these myths. Even the FBI joined in by harassing us, hunting us down, creating more trauma and loss. We were told the students deserved it … and our government wanted those who demanded truth to pay, too.

After Allison’s funeral and grieving with my family that first week, I returned to ninth grade with teachers who shared “they should have shot more.” I remember my french teacher menacingly demanding I make up every test, every lesson for the week I missed. I was told to buck up and get over it. Her sentiments were echoed around school, in the news, at my parents’ jobs and just about everywhere we turned.

False narratives were smeared about my sister Allison in the newspapers and discussed on the radio. According to their propaganda Allison was a loudmouth protester, a slut and was pregnant with sexually transmitted disease and crabs. None of this was true.

According to the press, Allison was a young girl who deserved what she got, along with all her friends. Instead, Allison was a 19-yr-old, freshman honors student at Kent State University and she was unarmed as she protested the Vietnam war when the government shot her dead.

44 years later I learned at the United Nations that Allison was target assassinated by her government and that because she was protesting her government when they killed her, it was a human rights crime. Taking Kent State to the U.N. http://bit.ly/1KTBGsI

My father Arthur Krause took the issues of the Kent State massacre to the U.S. judicial system. I remember Dad wanted to show my generation how government worked, that the truth about Kent State would come out in the courts through litigation. After nine years of expensive litigation, our family settled with all the other survivors. We received $15,000 and a statement of regret. Dad never got over it. Read the Kent State civil settlement statement http://bit.ly/1qd9tTO About Dad’s case http://bit.ly/2YATbbQ

It didn’t take long for me to see that American leadership has never wanted us to heal. When a human being experiences trauma, the person usually withdraws, finds it hard to connect with others and/or never takes real action to heal their life. A government traumatizing the masses finds it easier to control them.

Seeking your tax-deductible DONATION to the Kent State Truth Tribunal through our fiscal sponsor the Institute for Media Analysis.

By the time I was out of the house and in college at 17, I was searching for any way to heal. In 1975 going to therapy was frowned upon, very expensive and an uncommon path. It wasn’t until I flipped out that I finally got my parents’ attention. With my mother at the medical center considering moving into a facility for in-patient therapy, the intake person shared that they didn’t use “shock treatments” unless it was necessary, helping me decide on out-patient therapy. That first experience in therapy helped me find my way in turning 20, a year older than Allison, but little else. For the next 30 years I attempted to heal my PTSD wounds with every therapy I could find. Nothing really made a difference.

It wasn’t until eight years ago that I began to heal my Kent State wound. At an Occupy festival I was introduced to an EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprogramming) therapist and worked with her for more than three years. Even in the first session, I found relief and the healing built upon each therapy session. My wounds at Kent State were healed like never before. About EMDR http://bit.ly/2RDijen

Suicide may be today’s response to PTSD and survivor’s guilt. I understand not being able to live with the pain. IT BREAKS MY HEART these three gun violence survivors have made the choice of suicide. When nothing changes and there is no healing, we must assume there will only be more suicides. About Parkland http://bit.ly/2sJWiCp

In 2010, 40 years after the Kent State massacre, I got lucky in co-founding the Kent State Truth Tribunal with Emily Aigner Kunstler. During the 40th anniversary year we had three Kent State Truth Tribunals to film the stories of original participants and witnesses of the massacre. Even though we continue to be blackballed by Kent State University and stymied in securing our funding to complete our archive of the “People’s History of Kent State,” this activity helps me heal. http://bit.ly/2H9oV2f

When we turn the horror and trauma in our lives into something beneficial, we heal.

Each day taking action for truth at Kent State and Jackson State, little by little, my wounds control me less and less. I hope my healing extends to the collective, where we may all partake and heal.

Survivors of Sandy Hook and Parkland deserve their healing … every human being deserves to heal.

Kent State Truth Tribunal The Allison Center for Peace Peaceful Party

Sculpture by Albert György

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November 9, 2018 from the Allison Center for Peace

On November 9, 2018 Kent State University at the May 4 Visitor Center will unveil a new exhibit for one of the four student protesters against the Vietnam War killed on May 4, 1970. 48 years after the massacre Kent State’s ‘institutional view’ of a key actor from that day will be revealed and installed.

At the May 4 Visitor Center Dr. Mindy Farmer is charged with creating ‘tributes’ for the fallen four at Kent State. Years ago Farmer was hired at the University based on her resume with corresponding background, especially her most recent employment for five years at the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum.

For sharing her view of the story of the Kent State massacre, Farmer’s experience could not be more prejudiced or inappropriate. With Farmer in charge, along with KSU president Beverly Warren offering institutional power and funds, Farmer refused to take into consideration the wishes of surviving families or their views of their loved ones slaughtered at Kent State. Farmer emailed no invitations to the surviving family of the tribute she’s opening today on November 9th.

It was on November 4, 2018 when we were first heard of the November 9th Allison tribute unveiling. An email arrived from a 1970 roommate of Allison’s with the announcement attached. Upon receiving the news, we responded with sadness that Allison’s family had not been invited to her tribute. Allison’s roommate’s offered, “I’m so incredibly sorry to hear this, but somehow not surprised. And I wasn’t invited either. 49 years and still wrong!”

There are covert and menacing activities at work behind these actions of Kent State University and the May 4th Visitor Center. Ever since triggers were pulled at Kent State, the University has refused to involve all who were harmed that day, most notably the surviving families have been silenced.

Kent State University has worried so much more for the damage the KSU brand has suffered by the Kent State massacre, than for offering compassion, sharing an accurate story of what occurred back in 1970, or for setting history right. From an institutional view, Kent State truth to still so radioactive the University is busy intentionally erasing truth, offering instead their same old, confusing, in-credible Kent State cover-up at the May 4 Visitor Center.

Forgotten in all the Kent State exhibits are a few very important points … That the deaths of anti-war protesters in the Kent State and Jackson State massacres helped bring an accelerated end to the Vietnam War, thus also saving lives. Those who died as they protested the Vietnam War were heroes and American patriots, and they’re still not correctly honored for that act.

As Farmer and her colleagues plot to install ONLY their version of the Kent State massacre, censor all other narratives and hide Kent State truth, organizations like ours, the Kent State Truth Tribunal formed in 2010, are blackballed at the May 4 Visitor Center. Truth is essentially in exile at Kent State.

Not invited to participate in creating the Allison tribute, or to the opening of her exhibit, is an intentional act of malice to hurt and stick it to all who honor Allison. Kent State University exclusion has been going on since Allison was killed and it will probably continue long after her family passes away. Institutions like Kent State and the May 4 Visitor Center refuse truth, compassion or humanity in their acts to cover-up Kent State truth for the future. They must not be in charge of how we remember Allison.

So what would Allison want? My sense is she does not want Kent State University and the May 4 Visitor Center authoring her legacy or promoting false views of what she brought our world in her short 19 years. Allison hopes the lessons of her killing will help us heal and come together as peaceful Americans.

On May 4, 1970 Allison stood and died for the cause of peace. She was demonstrating against the Vietnam War and protesting when she faced a military firing squad of Ohio National Guardsmen that shot her dead along with three other students at noontime at Kent State University.

Even though the University invited the military onto the campus on May 4, 1970, 48 years later KSU continues to refuse to acknowledge their culpability or take any responsibility. Impunity has been their protection. Forget about amends being made, reconciliation or healing. Kent State was a military event bringing the Vietnam War home and they won.

Allison hoped the exhibit offered truth from those who knew and loved her. Kent State University and the May 4 Visitor Center have failed miserably in this regard. Farmer has intentionally refused all who loved Allison to share her story or to have a voice, and KSU president Warren stands with Farmer.

When our organization the Kent State Truth Tribunal took Kent State to Geneva, Switzerland before the UN Human Rights Committee in March 2014, I was surprised at how many people outside the United States knew about my sister Allison at Kent State. I realized Allison’s death has not been in vain. Her killing as a student protester against war struck a nerve around the world and has not diminished.

The Allison tribute her family wasn’t invited to illustrates how these institutional views continue to refuse basic TRUTHS of Kent State. In expressing their First Amendment right of protest, four Kent State students were killed by the military. From the United Nations Human Rights Committee I learned that Allison was target assassinated by the government and they killed her during her act of protest.

All who protest in America today are still very much at risk of being shot dead by the government, military and law enforcement because of this Kent State and Jackson State precedent, and the institutional failures to acknowledge these truths and related constitutional wrongs. There has been so little healing.

In the scheme of things this Allison exhibit doesn’t matter much until we remember the quickly approaching 50th Kent State massacre anniversary on May 4, 2020, just 18 months away.

Will it remain true that “History is written by the victors”? At Kent State, we’re hoping for the 50th … not this time.

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“As we stood on the hill watching and waiting for the soldiers to make their move, Allison ripped in half the moistened cloth she had brought for protection against tear gas. Another dispersal order was given, yet no advance was made, so Allison felt safe in running a few yards to give a friend part of her already compromised cloth. She tore hers again and gave him half. It was a small gesture, but one that so clearly demonstrated her consideration and willingness to share.

Tear gas was already being fired as she scrambled back to where I was waiting. We stood for a few seconds, watching the soldiers move out behind a screen of gas, before deciding to retreat with a crowd of students. As we began to retreat over the hill, I could see Allison almost beginning to cry. A few steps further she turned to me with tears rolling down her cheeks and asked, ‘Why are they doing this to us? Why don’t they let us be?’ A peaceful assembly was being violently disrupted, breeding anger in most of those being dispersed. However Allison did not feel anger, but rather disappointment and sorrow.

Disappointment because the students were not given a chance to gather peacefully, and sorrow because of the violence she felt would ensue. Unfortunately these passive emotions were soon transformed into aggression, for as we retreated, a gas canister landed at our feet, exploding in our faces. It was at this point that Allison’s sorrow changed to anger and her strained tolerance turned to resistance.

After a few seconds of recovery, Allison turned in her tracks and froze. She stood in the path of the pursuing troops screaming at the top of her lungs. Having been pushed too far, she now lashed back and I was forced to pull her along, fearing that the distance between us and the oncoming troops was becoming critical. Twice, before we reached the crest of the hill, she turned to speak her mind to these men. Each time I had to pull her onward.

Upon reaching the top of the hill, she again turned, and with tears streaming down her cheeks, she screamed and yelled and stomped her feet as if all her yelling might stop these men. The hand drawn to her face holds a wet rag used to protect herself from the gas, and the other holds mine, with which I pulled her over the hill and into the parking lot, a safe distance from the troops.

For several minutes we stood in the parking lot watching these men threaten us with their rifles. In response, we cursed them and threw rocks. When they left we followed, all the time screaming and yelling, and then they turned.”

An excerpt from ‘What Remains’ by Allison’s cousin Jennifer Schwartz Mrazek. READ http://bit.ly/1rUHlbF

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May 2, 2017 by Laurel Krause

As protest season opens across America, citizen concern for the safety and protection of protesters comes to the fore. Like so many Americans raised in the Sixties, I experience a post-traumatic stress trigger every time a protester faces off with the brute force of law enforcement, bringing back all the memories of the violence against protesters we witnessed during the Vietnam war and Civil Rights movement.

Today whether it’s Water Protectors at Standing Rock, Climate Change Marchers, Black Lives Matters advocates, activists protesting the president’s unconstitutional executive orders, even mass protesters at January’s Women’s March and April’s March for Science, all risk arrest, being made into targets for simply exercising First Amendment rights.

I remember when the US government killed six student protesters at Kent State and Jackson State in May of 1970. The precedent to kill, and get away with it, was established early on in the life of our country however this was the first time it was televised for the world to experience first hand. It hasn’t helped that the US government continues to refuse to accept accountability, admitting no wrongdoing in its targeted assassinations of Americans, including young people who have actively disagreed with American leadership.

In April 2017 Pepsi launched a controversial and pricey protest commercial starring Kendall Jenner. The extended two and one half minute short was immediately scrapped after a very strong negative response from the viewing public. The ‘kinder, gentler’ soft soap version of this battle between protesters and law enforcement in America failed to resonate. No one bought it. Protesters will never save the day by opening a can of soda pop. The commercial irresponsibly and dangerously projects an image of safety while ignoring the actual danger of deadly force from police. This type of advertising is not new. Watch the Pepsi 2017 commercial http://bit.ly/2oJlBOT and watch the Coke commercial from 1971 http://bit.ly/2pjQEEh.

Who made the decision at Pepsi to invest in this fable of a gentle and safe world for protesters? Is this some kind of set up? Will those who are unaware of the blood spilled by protesters and the actual risk of conflict — sometimes deadly — between the police and our black and brown brothers and sisters, be tricked by this ‘kinder, gentler protest world’ imagineered by corporatocracy?

The Pepsi protest commercial is an insult to legions of American protesters who have shed rivers of blood, and still face violent, brute force from authorities. Bernice A. King, the daughter of assassinated Reverend Dr. Martin L. King, Jr. summed it up well in her April 6th tweet, “If only Daddy would have known about the power of Pepsi”.

The truth is that protesting in America has always been extremely dangerous, and as my sister Allison Krause learned on May 4, 1970 in an anti-war rally at Kent State University, it can get you killed by government forces.

Forty-seven years ago Allison was gunned down by the Ohio National Guard at Kent State because she was protesting. The Pepsi commercial is an insult to Allison’s memory. It mocks her bravery and masks the personal risks she took to create a better world for all of us. No quantity of Pepsi could have saved Allison from the brute force of unrestrained government power and a national guard that willingly acted as government henchmen. A Pepsi, in fact, did not stop the bullet that took her life that day.

The Kent State Truth Tribunal seeks accountability and the acknowledgement of startling evidence revealed in 2010 – an exposed command to fire – that emerged, sharing a whole new view of what went down May 4, 1970 at the Kent State massacre, a view so starkly in contrast to the previous official version that it provoked – finally – an admission by the US government that my sister was “killed, murdered’’ by the US government.

For those seven years since we founded the Truth Tribunal, I have spread the word of wrongful protest harassment and killing, and have sought answers about command responsibility, taking the human rights issues of Kent State all the way to the United Nations. http://bbc.in/1qwOdqe.

The 2010 Kent State evidence exists in the form an audio recording of the actual command to fire, digitally isolated and verified by forensic audio expert Stuart Allen. http://bit.ly/aM7Ocm. Have a listen to Stuart Allen analyzing the Kent State tape and hear the command to fire: http://bit.ly/R4Ktio

I learned at the Truth Tribunal how the targeted assassinations at Kent State and Jackson State forever changed the landscape of protest in the United States. One of the top comments I’ve heard is from Maureen Bean Ui Lassig shared, “A horrific day none of us could ever forget. The unimaginable happened. Our children, the kids that would help to shape our future, were shot dead by our own government. RIP Allison.” Most share that they could never view the American government in the same way again.

Back then we watched the military and cops dressed in armor, bearing heavy weaponry created for war, trample the flowers, lives and dreams of those who stood for peace; it reminds me of Allison and her epitaph, “Flowers are better than bullets”.

We must be able to protest in America and express our dissent without fear of death, excessive force or wrongful arrest. The illegal and immoral exercise of power by government forces, corporations and covert groups organized to harm protesters, thwart protests, turn protests into violent, military events (by their very presence), must cease. Intimidating, deterring, and killing protesters violates basic human rights law and the US Constitution, the Bill of Rights. It is also a clear sign of a totalitarian government or dictatorship.

With all this on my mind, I attended an April 2017 Town Hall organized by my Congressman Jared Huffman. During the local event, I asked Representative Huffman to help protect protesters by developing legislation for their protection. I voiced my concern for the lives of Water Protectors at Standing Rock, bolstered by applause from my community. I asked Rep. Huffman to help us counteract the legislation, and law enforcement strategies, seeking to limit our rights to protest. We are beginning our efforts to establish the Allison Krause Bill for the Protection of Protest and Protesters in America.

Who knows what may go wrong this season of protest 2017, especially when we consider the plethora of state legislation intended to limit, hurt and criminalize protest. Even the right to protest on the sidewalk in front of White House is being tried in the courts now at the request of President Trump. http://reut.rs/2pmt6yM

I don’t want to see another protester killed for protesting. It is an American first amendment right to protest that guarantees the right to assemble and take action to disagree and dissent – that is the right to protest! Currently protesters face excessive force, including deadly force, as well as wrongful arrest.

Please join me in demanding your Congressional representatives to support the Allison Krause Bill for the Protection of Protest and Protesters in America, legislation intended to protect the right of Americans to protest without getting killed.

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On October 19, 2016 before the US Dept of the Interior and the National Park Service, the Kent State Massacre nomination for National Historic Landmark status was heard. Please read Mary Ann Vecchio’s comment before the nomination advisory board in Washington, D.C. offered on October 19, 2016:

©1970 John Filo. All Rights reserved.

©1970 John Filo. All Rights reserved.

My name is Mary Ann Vecchio. I am the 14-year-old in the iconic, Pulitzer-prize-winning photo taken at Kent State. I am pictured kneeling above the body of 20-year old Jeff Miller as he lay dying. I am here because I am deeply concerned about this application to designate Kent State as a National Historic Landmark. I am also a member of the National Parks Service, an institution that I love from the core of my being.

Like so many of us present at the Kent State shootings, I have carried profound life-long consequences for my presence at the massacre site. My exclusion from this process is an indication of how poorly it has been executed.

Kent State University does not own the narrative of what took place on May 4, 1970. It belongs to each of us there that day, those injured, whose lives were forever altered, and above all to the families of those killed. That fateful day harmed all of us and this exclusionary process which seeks to rewrite the truth is newly re-victimizing.

I have had a chance to review the 144-page landmark nomination report and have come before you to say that the facts included in the report are inaccurate and incomplete. A credible account of the Kent State shootings is not being presented to the Department of Interior in this landmark nomination.

Kent State University has only allowed one side of the truth to be told over these last 46 years, yet it has not been challenged for this revisionism. At what point can the victims and witnesses present at Kent State be heard and stop being subjected to these untruths and distortions? The government injured us once and we are before a government commission again. We cannot bring back those lost at Kent State so all we have at this point is the truth.

There are many elements and recent developments completely censored from the nomination report, I will list just a few that have meaning for me:

New forensic evidence emerged in 2010 which established a command to fire, debunking the idea that the national guard acted spontaneously. This evidence, produced by forensic scientist Stuart Allen, was not even mentioned in the landmark report. Stuart Allen’s analysis points to government complicity at Kent State – a central feature of the accountability the victims have been seeking for decades.

On a more symbolic note but one dear to me, Neil Young’s anthem to the Kent State massacre, the popular song Ohio, is also not mentioned in the KSU nomination report.

Finally, the photo which exposed me to public scrutiny for decades is not explored in this report. I am happy to honor those harmed at Kent State with the circulation of that iconic photograph, an indication of how well-known and well-documented the massacre has been, but it grieves me deeply to know that the vast exposure of this historic event can result in a report so weighted with untruths. I deserve the truth, those killed at Kent State deserve the truth, and the American people as a whole certainly do too.

I have other objections to the content of the landmark application which I am happy to share if my further participation is invited by the Landmark Commission.

I am asking the National Parks Service to please pause, and listen to all concerned about this project, certainly not just Kent State University’s purported experts.

 



From Pat LaMarche in the Huffington Post on the Kent State massacre landmark nomination hearing, October 19, 2016 http://huff.to/2dwIqmU

The Kent State University landmark nomination report on the Kent State massacre that occurred May 4, 1970 http://bit.ly/2cIV1lO

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August 18, 2016 by Howard Lisnoff

Published first at Counter Punch http://bit.ly/2bfU5Er

KissingerNixonForeignAffairsIf you happened to be an anti-war protester during the Vietnam War, then the following interchange between the late President Richard  Nixon and his national security advisor, Henry Kissinger, is telling:

[T]he President told Kissinger:

At Kent State there were 4 or 5 killed today. But that place has been bad for quite some time—it has been rather violent.” Kissinger suggested that the Nixon administration would be blamed for the killings and he noted that thirty-three university presidents were appealing to the President to leave Vietnam.

The President asked about the student strike, observing: “If it’s peaceful it doesn’t bother me.” Still, Nixon worried if the students were “out of classes they’ll be able to raise hell.” Kissinger thought they would hold teach-ins and possibly march on Washington. Nixon hoped “we can get some people of our own to speak out.”

Kissinger stated that “The university presidents are a disgrace,” to which Nixon replied: “They still get an inordinate amount of publicity, like the students. We have to stand hard as a rock. Everybody’s been through this—de Gaulle, Marcos…If countries begin to be run by children, God help us.” Kissinger suggested that “of course, student disorders hurt us politically.”

The President responded: “They don’t if it doesn’t appear we caused them.”

(Library of Congress, Manuscript Division, Kissinger Papers, Box 363, Telephone Conversations, Chronological File) (“May 4, 1970: Nixon & Kissinger’s Kent State phone call,” The Daily Kos, May 4, 2011).

Nixon’s observation that Kent State “has been bad for quite some time—it has been rather violent,” is a complete revisionist version of the anti-war movement at Kent State. The “worst” that can be said about the events leading up to the massacre of students at Kent State is that some students threw rocks at the armed occupying force of the National Guard, most rocks falling harmlessly to the ground. Few massacres of unarmed civilians are justified because a few people threw rocks at an armed occupying force.

It’s not such a surprise to those who know the history of the period, or the obvious terror of Kent State and Jackson State, but what demands scrutiny is the fact that the architect and the advisor of many wars and covert operations is now being flaunted as a trusted and respected statesman by Hillary Clinton, who will most likely be the next president of the United States. Bernie Sanders knew enough to stay away from Kissinger like poison and he said as much during the presidential primary season. Senator Sanders:

I happen to believe that Henry Kissinger was one of the most destructive secretaries of state in the modern history of this country,” Sanders said at Thursday’s Democratic presidential debate, referring to Clinton citing the former secretary of state’s praise for her work in that same position.

“I am proud to say that Henry Kissinger is not my friend. I will not take advice from Henry Kissinger,” he added, (“Bernie Sanders Ties Clinton To Henry Kissinger: ‘Not My Kind of Guy,’” TPM Livewire, February 11, 2016).

Kissinger comes across in the Nixon interchange like a true Machiavellian. Neither Nixon nor Kissinger gave a damn about the kids who had just been killed. Here students have been killed in cold blood and these two extraordinarily powerful men are discussing how best to handle the situation as it were some minor irritant or issue that needed to be managed into historical oblivion. It is cynicism of the democratic process at its lowest common denominator. And it’s not so much that Kissinger was out of step with the haters around him during that historical era, it’s just that he was in such an important position in government and he had the ear of the president while student unrest in the face of the Vietnam War and the U.S. incursion into Cambodia were causing the explosion of student protest across the nation. And the vast and overwhelming majority of that protest movement was peaceful no matter what the historical revisionists would like that revised history to read.

Nixon called student protesters “bums.” The governor of Ohio, James Rhodes, called them “brown shirts.” The governor of California, Ronald Reagan, called for a “bloodbath” of students who protested the war. The director of the FBI, J. Edgar Hoover, said “the students invited (the shootings) and got what they deserved.” With hate speech like this, it is not difficult to draw a straight line between the protest of wars and the massacre of protesters.

Hillary Clinton pays homage to Kissinger, one of the architects of Nixon’s “secret” plan for peace that killed millions of people in Southeast Asia and thousands of Americans. She values Kissinger for his “belief in the indispensability of continued American leadership in service of a just and liberal order,” (“Does Hillary Clinton see that invoking Henry Kissinger harms her campaign?” The Guardian, February 13, 2016). Is Hillary Clinton delusional in her homage of Kissinger? That homage is both nauseating and a perversion of the history of the Vietnam era.

And this from the New York Times:

Mrs. Clinton’s dogged pursuit of Republican votes has especially rankled progressives, and highlights the divisions within the Democratic Party, even as they see a victory more likely. They have grumbled at her eager promotion of endorsements from veterans of the George W. Bush and Reagan administrations, including that of John D. Negroponte, a top diplomat and intelligence official under Mr. Bush. They worry aloud that Henry Kissinger, of whom Mrs. Clinton has often spoken fondly, could be next (“Hillary Clinton’s Edge in a Donald Trump-Centric Race Has Liberals Wary,” August 14, 2016).

The presidential race is not a choice between an evil and a lesser evil. It is more fully understood as a race between two proponents of the status quo, which means business as usual in the conduct of unending wars, of which Kissinger was an active proponent. His philosophy of Machiavellian Realpolitik can be seen in conflicts in Chile, East Timor, and Bangladesh during his tenure as national security advisor and secretary of state.

Who knows where Hillary Clinton’s propensity to rely on the use of force will lead the government? More war in Syria? Renewed U.S. war in Libya? Continued war in Afghanistan? Expanded war in Iraq? The possibilities are limitless and could even involve provocative action with Russia. Much profit and “glory” are to be made from war and the preparations for war, as was anticipated in the warning of Dwight Eisenhower about the immense power and danger of the military-industrial complex.

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